Hawai’ians Like Spam But I Don’t

Those living in Hawai’i are proud to be known as the Spam capital of the world. They eat more Spam per capita than anywhere else that I am aware of. If you go into a McDonalds in Hawai’i, you can find a list of breakfast meal deals that include Spam. It doesn’t hurt that their pork and beef products are almost 100 percent imported and Spam is among the cheapest ways to get meat.

But I don’t like Spam… or spam. I just checked the statistics for CSPT. This site will break the 40,600 comment mark sometime this month. It will also break the 670,000 spam mark sometime this month. And huge quantities of that spam are wholly societal-dregs value.

As I’m on during hours when most Americans are sleeping, I have made it a point to try to rescue comments from the moderation filter. I used to try to rescue comments from the spam filter without prompting but I have given that up. No amount of Ivory soap can clean a body from what is in that filter.

BUT I CONSIDER the heavy dosage of spam that gets filtered to be a mark CSPT can be proud of. Any site that gets a 16-1 spam-comment ratio is getting enough traffic to be proud of. And it isn’t the article authors that makes the whole thing go. It is those who comment on the articles posted and those who lurk and just read. Those hits are what make CSPT so enticing to spammers. And that huge spam-comment ratio gives me, at least, a feeling that CSPT is indeed getting the word out on many important and frivolous matters, and a feeling that the commenters here are being heard outside our little circle.

10 Comments

  1. I remember eating a lot of Spam as a kid. It usually occurred during the many strike periods that were provided by the Steelworker’s Union.

  2. I have a few cans of spam in the pantry. They might be over 15 years old. I suppose I should check the dates on them, however, if anyone around here ever actually opens a can to eat it that probably means they are on the brink of starvation.

  3. John and York,
    Speaking of the original Spam.

    I too recall having had it once or twice as a kid: on a couple of those weekend mornings when my father would usually take the helm in the kitchen and cook-up a full “country” breakfast for the family.

    I have a vague recollection that on those occasions he did it, that he did it partly out of some announced sense of nostalgia of his own; possibly, as I recall, relating to his previous Naval service.

    In any event we were pretty unappreciative, and made clear our preference for the usual canadian bacon, or ham or regular bacon to go along with the fried potatoes and eggs, etc. He seemed to be a bit surprised and disappointed in the Spam too, the reality not quite matching the memory.

    Thirty and more years later I’ve found myself keeping a few cans in the hunting cabin along with the MREs, Mountain House meals, and the tinned corned beef. As in JohnC’s case, it usually sits there untouched until it is thrown away.

    As an experiment I once attempted to fry it up “an extra long time” in a skillet, until it “solidified” into what I expected would be something resembling a slab of grilled chopped-ham. It didn’t quite work. It remained soft and unappealing until it transitioned into a cracker-like mini slab of pseudo-chitterlings.

    So much for its being made from the finest cuts of pork shoulders or whatever they claim it is made of. If you need an emergency ration at the lodge, you might do better to stick a couple of small cans of Danish ham in the cabinet …

    Huh, it occurs to me that Dana could make an entire entry out of the topic of obsolecent, or popularly waning foods.

  4. I remember my mother cutting the Spam into little slabs and frying it. It was edible. Especially if there was nothing else around or coming in the house.

  5. ” I remember my mother cutting the Spam into little slabs and frying it. It was edible. Especially if there was nothing else around or coming in the house.”

    There’s certainly nothing contemptible about eating it. And, as my father’s case illustrates (and some people in Hawaii obviously), a fair number of people have positive memories of, or a continuing fondness for, it.

    Maybe I didn’t know how to use it.

    While in H.S./college I worked for a time in a supermarket, and I believe I recall that there were a couple of other similar products available.

  6. I have a few cans of spam in the pantry. They might be over 15 years old. I suppose I should check the dates on them, however, if anyone around here ever actually opens a can to eat it that probably means they are on the brink of starvation.

    I guess it’s either that, or dog food. Either will work as a last resort in a survival situation.

  7. While in H.S./college I worked for a time in a supermarket, and I believe I recall that there were a couple of other similar products available.

    My favorite is devilled ham. Used to pack it along on Boy Scout camping trips. Tastes good, takes up little space, and is high in fat and energy.

  8. Eric, I was just thinking about the deviled ham while scrolling down here, and see you beat me to it! I remember there being a few cans on the shelf when I was a kid and we would open one up and eat it every so often. I can’t ever recall buying any as an adult.

  9. There is a “food” up here with the Yankees called “scrapple.” The dictionary defines scrapple as “a mush of ground pork and cornmeal that is set in a mold and then sliced and fried,” but a more accurate definition would be “compressed floor sweepings,” and the Yankees actually eat this stuff.

    Ugh!

  10. And I will publicly thank the esteemed Mr Hitchcock for his work in watching the site, in zapping spam and releasing comments that get stuck in moderation.

    Unlike a lot of people in my industry, my work has increased: we’re doing a 52,000 yd¬≥ project, and it doesn’t stop for the winter. I got home at 2000 last night, and would figure on another late day today if I weren’t off to get my eye lasered. That means that I’ve had less time to pay attention to the site than I should, and John has done great work.

Comments are closed.