Just my luck

It was just a few minutes before it was time to leave for Mass — today’s Ash Wednesday, you know! — when suddenly it hit me: I hadn’t drained the water out of the plant. I checked the Weather Channel quickly, and it said that the low was supposed to be around 30º F tonight, but it was still four degrees above freezing. So, I went to Mass, got my ashes, and then had to head over to the plant. It took me twelve minutes to get there, and twelve minutes to get back home, all to do a 2½ minute job. But if I hadn’t done it, I could have had a disaster in the morning.

So, did I have good luck in remembering it before it was too late, or bad luck, in not remembering it before I left for the day? At any rate, Mrs Pico told me to buy a Powerball ticket tonight; I’m certain that I’m now millions of dollars wealthier!

12 Comments

  1. I’m gonna say this one more time Mr. “Rich” guy—-put a small sign on your dashboard that says “has the water been drained tonight”. It’s really not rocket science and the regressive brain cells will thank you and your “gambling pocket-book”

  2. John: Guessing that by, “Huh?” you were wondering why I have to drain the water, at a concrete plant there are outside water sources from which the trucks full their water tanks. At my plant there are three valves, and some steel pipe exposed to the weather. Whenever it’s going to get close to freezing, I open those valves and drain the water out of the lines. If I forget and those lines freeze, I could have three brass valves plus a lot of steel line that might be broken, Even if the freeze isn’t hard enough to break the lines or valves, an ice plug can prevent the trucks from filling their water tanks in the morning.

  3. And in continuing luck, a contractor hit a power pole this morning at 0840, and when I say hit, I mean hit: he shattered one pole and damaged two others, and we had no electricity for the rest of the day. PP&L Electric was still working on the poles when I left work.

  4. when you go to church do you block out the part of your brain that supports the war that kills thousands and thousands of men, women and children?

    I find it amusing that someone like you and the lot of “followers” in general are able to be so devoted but pick and choose what part of jesus’ teachings you want to honor

  5. This many years after my graduation from the University of Kentucky, it’s sometimes difficult to remember every lesson from every course. But one I do remember, to this day, was by Dr Vincent Davis, then Chairman of the Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce. Dr Davis pointed out something very simple, so simple that a lot of people cannot see it. “When you have the power to do something, and you choose not to do it, you have taken an action just as surely as if you had done what you could have done.”

    And so it is with Iraq. Our friends on the left seem to have forgotten what Iraq was under Saddam Hussein, a brutal dictatorship, where dissent was not tolerated, freedom did not exist, and sudden — or not so sudden — death could be capricious, depending on whose attention you caught. Iraq was a country that, under the Ba’ath Party regime, had slaughtered somewhere between half a million and a million and a half of its own people to enforce the dictatorship.

    It’s very unfortunate that the liberation of Iraq was not as quick as we had hoped, and that the death toll is much higher than we had planned. But having had the power to overthrow the Ba’ath Party regime and not doing so would have made us complicit in the actions of that regime.

    I take it from this story on your fine site that you were reared Catholic. If co, then you surely know the Confiteor:

    Confiteor Deo omnipotenti et vobis, fratres,
    quia peccavi nimis
    cogitatione, verbo, opere, et omissióne:
    mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa.
    Ideo precor beatam Mariam semper Vírginem,
    omnes Angelos et Sanctos,
    et vos, fratres, orare pro me
    ad Dominum Deum nostrum.

    Oops, Latin not what it should be? In English:

    I confess to almighty God,
    and to you, my brothers and sisters,
    that I have sinned through my own fault,
    in my thoughts and in my words,
    in what I have done, and in what I have failed to do;
    and I ask blessed Mary, ever virgin,
    all the angels and saints,
    and you, my brothers and sisters,
    to pray for me to the Lord our God.

    To not resist evil, when it is in your power to do so, is also a sin. It is, in effect, the action of Pontius Pilate, who washed his hands of the evil he had the power to prevent.

  6. And so it is with Iraq. Our friends on the left seem to have forgotten what Iraq was under Saddam Hussein, a brutal dictatorship, where dissent was not tolerated, freedom did not exist, and sudden — or not so sudden — death could be capricious, depending on whose attention you caught. Iraq was a country that, under the Ba’ath Party regime, had slaughtered somewhere between half a million and a million and a half of its own people to enforce the dictatorship.

    yawn…zzzzzzz. Go buy another lame excuse. Even your church has said this wasn’t a even close to a “just war” dana. So who are you to go pulling this crap out of your ass?

    Just because someone is weeally, weeally awful, doesn’t make it a legitimate reason to go to war.

  7. Donviti wrote:

    Just because someone is weeally, weeally awful, doesn’t make it a legitimate reason to go to war.

    You forgot the proper attribution to that quote: Neville Chamberlain, 1938.

    Of course, the United Kingdom and France declared war on Germany in September of 1939 not because the Third Reich invaded them, but because the Wehrmacht invaded Poland, a country to which they had given an unconditional guarantee, but one they were powerless to enforce. The British and French could, or at least would, do nothing about the invasion of Poland; should I assume that, under the logic you have used above, they should have said, “Well, gosh, Chancellor Hitler, you were really a naughty boy, and we don’t like you very much,” and left it at that?

  8. I didn’t forget anything….

    “just war” my friend. If you are so devout then you’d be right on board with YOUR church, that Aquinas guy and a few others….. But alas, like so many in your church, you are a fraud.

  9. I am not Catholic. I am Protestant. And, reading that English translation of the Latin, I agree. The sin of omission is still a sin. In fact, I believe the sin of omission is oftentimes far more egregious than the sin of commission. When a Christian commits the sin of omission, it is usually as a result of a non-Christian’s sin of commission.

    If you have the power to stop the unbeliever’s sin of commission and choose to do nothing, you are more guilty than the unbeliever because you most definitely know better. You have chosen to be beholden to Christ. You have chosen to be called one of His own. And you turned your back on “the least of these,” despite your sacred oaths.

  10. Iraqi historians will look upon
    donviti’s perspective/”proclaimation” of their liberation from tyranny as an isolationist view brought on by the liberal phenomenon called BDS, where the “price” of the war is measured in monetary expenditures and personal hatred, rather than the human sacrifices (on all sides) that committed to achieve the liberties and freedoms all societies deserve, (including our first amendment that allows any moron to espouse their opinions)

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