Pull-Out of Troops From Iraq

This is a totally confusing situation that on its face looks ill conceived. Now before the Lefties go all bonkers and say it was Bush who negotiated this, I KNOW that. But that was three years ago and the world has changed. Iran either has, or is close to nukes now, not then. Egypt was firmly held by Mubarak then, not now. Libya was held by Gadaffi then, not now. The Muslim Brotherhood has a grip on Egypt now, not then. Al-Q was pretty fighting in Afghanistan, and hiding in Pakistan, then and now. Syria, Saddam’s brother in the Ba’ath Party is killing opposition people by the hundreds. Israel’s treaty with Egypt is all but torn up. So, all this is to say, the world Bush lived in when Force pull-out was negotiated, is not the world Obama has found himself in today. Since then, Iran has grown stronger in spite of the world trying to prevent that. Iran has sent ships to the Med. Iran says they will sail off our coast. Iran’s rocket ability has been improved greatly. So, my thought and opinion, it seems insane to pull out all our combat forces. I just don’t see that Obama has a firm grip on reality. Of course, we could keep them in Kuwait.

11 Comments

  1. Actually, the New York Times said the full pull-out was the result of the Obama administration’s failed negotiations and that neither the US nor Iraq wanted the US pulled out. It’s another Obama fail, according to the New York Times.

  2. John Hitchcock says:
    23 October 2011 at 14:12 (Edit)

    Actually, the New York Times said the full pull-out was the result of the Obama administration’s failed negotiations and that neither the US nor Iraq wanted the US pulled out. It’s another Obama fail, according to the New York Times.

    Say it ain’t so!!! The NYT did a random act of real Journalism?

  3. Actually, I’d guess that it really wasn’t failed negotiations, but President Obama deciding that a total withdrawal, now that the war is over, was better politically for him, and, in fact, it does keep a 2008 campaign promise.

    I’m actually undecided on this issue. On one hand, I think that we’d be in a better position if we kept some troops there, but, on the other, I have concerns that we really don’t need to keep troops everywhere, and maybe we are better off pulling them completely out of Iraq. There may be more trouble for the Iraqi government if we do, but we don’t know that, and there might just as well be more trouble for them if we didn’t pullout completely.

    Further, by pulling out all of our troops, President Obama is keeping a promise made by President Bush, and I think/ hope/ guess that it may help the stability of the Afghan government, if it can be pointed out that we have kept our word in Iraq: we came, we liberated, and then we left.

    This is one of those situations in which we do not know and cannot know what the right thing to do is until after it’s already been done, and the results are in. But, as a guess, I’m going to say that it’s probably the wiser thing to do now, though I’m not confident that the future will prove it to have been the right decision. There’s a lot on which to criticize President Obama, but I won’t criticize him on this one.

  4. In the negotiations on this issue of keeping troops in Iraq beyond the deadline, the Iraqis refused to grant immunity to the American troops. Do any of you think it would be wise to keep troops there anyway without immunity? I don’t think so!

  5. Perry says:
    23 October 2011 at 17:51
    In the negotiations on this issue of keeping troops in Iraq beyond the deadline, the Iraqis refused to grant immunity to the American troops. Do any of you think it would be wise to keep troops there anyway without immunity? I don’t think so!

    Perry, that is point that is better if not tested and would cause more trouble than it would solve. Point taken. My issue as stated is that the conditions under which Bush negotiated are no longer valid today. The Muddled East, Afghanistan, Iran and the Southern Med. have all changed drastically in three years. But the decision is made, we will live with it. We can hope our investment in soldiers, sailors, marines and air force as either dead, alive, and injured have not been done in vain. But the MAD MULLAHS of Iran with their agents in Iraq have other thoughts I fear.

  6. Actually, I’d guess that it really wasn’t failed negotiations, but President Obama deciding that a total withdrawal, now that the war is over, was better politically for him, and, in fact, it does keep a 2008 campaign promise.

    You’d guess wrong. Negotiations to keep troops there failed because no Iraqi politician is willing to continue to allow American troops license to murder or torture Iraqi civilians with legal immunity.

    Since the US knows that its troops do do such things, and will continue to do such things, it is unwilling to put them in a situation where they can be held accountable in a court of law.

  7. Looks likeHillary has mysame thoughts:

    Clinton to Iran: Don’t misread departure from Iraq

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Iran should not misread the withdrawal of American troops from Iraq as affecting the U.S. commitment to the fledgling democracy, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Sunday.

    President Barack Obama’s announcement Friday that all American troops would return from Iraq by the end of the year will close a chapter on U.S.-Iraq relations that began in 2003 with the U.S.-led invasion to overthrow Saddam Hussein.

    Washington has long worried that meddling by Iran, a Shiite Muslim theocracy, could inflame tensions between Iraq’s Shiite-led government and its minority Sunnis, setting off a chain reaction of violence and disputes across the Mideast.

    Moron this story Here:

    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_US_IRAN?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2011-10-23-17-49-35

  8. This little hideout in Kosovo where we went in 1999 and Clinton promised we’d be out in 2 years. It’s still up and running in 2011.

    Camp Bondsteel
    The United States agreed to provide a force of approximately 7,000 US personnel as part of the NATO KFOR to help maintain a capable military force in Kosovo and to ensure the safe return of Kosovar refugees. The US supports KFOR by providing the headquarters and troops for one of the four NATO sectors. The US also provides personnel, units and equipment to other components of the KFOR organization.

    Camp Bondsteel [CBS] is quite large: 955 acres or 360,000 square meters. If you were to run the outer perimeter, it is about 7 miles. Bondsteel is located on rolling hills and farmland near the city of Ferizaj/Urosevac. There are two dining facilities at Camp Bondsteel: one in North town and one in South town. The food is very well prepared and there are always a variety of main and side dishes to choose from. There are also salad bars, potato bars and multiple dessert offerings. Due to General Order #1, only alcohol-free beer is served, but it is better than nothing! There are set hours for meals, but each dining facility also has a 24-hour section for sandwiches, coffee, fruit, and continental breakfast items.

    Soldiers live in SEA (Southeast Asia) Huts. There are about 250 SEA Huts for living quarters and offices. The buildings have five living areas that house up to six soldiers each. Each building has one large bathroom with multiple shower and bathroom stalls. A few buildings have smaller bathroom facilities as well. Female and male sea huts are separate. The beds are comfortable and each room has its own heating/air conditioning unit. Soldiers get their own wall-locker for personal storage, and most opt to purchase a small set of plastic bins for additional storage. You can buy almost anything from the PX to make your living space more comfortable, such as TVs, DVD players, coffee makers and sound systems. Rooms are routinely inspected to make sure they adhere to fire and safety codes. The best way to improve the safety of your room is to purchase an approved surge protector for European voltage, and plug all of your lights and equipment into that. Adaptors are also available so you can plug your 220-compatible devices, like laptops, into the European outlets.

    More here:

    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/facility/camp-bondsteel.htm

  9. York, remember we’ll still be in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. We’ll be ready to go if Iran starts causing more trouble – though my money is on Iran’s regime self-immolating before they have the chance to immolate anyone else.

  10. Jeff says:
    26 October 2011 at 22:00

    York, remember we’ll still be in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. We’ll be ready to go if Iran starts causing more trouble – though my money is on Iran’s regime self-immolating before they have the chance to immolate anyone else.

    I think we basically moved most of our combat readiness to Kuwait after Gulf 1. When my son went to Iraq for his 6 month civilian in the Army stint, it was through Kuwait. Also, as mentioned Bahrain, and we’re somewhere in the horn of Africa. But, unfortunately, we’ll be in a day late response mode, instead of a deterrent. I read somewhere that BO and Biden ignored the Iraqi PM for the last year when he should have been schmoozed.

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