After all, we wouldn’t want to keep them from living amid their own filth, would we?

From The New York Times:

Cleanup of Zuccotti Park Is Canceled

By COLIN MOYNIHAN and CARA BUCKLEY

October 14, 2011, 7:04 AM

Shortly before the dawn announcement, the protesters sat vigil with their brooms. The cleanup of the Lower Manhattan park that has been occupied by protesters for nearly a month was canceled Friday shortly before it was supposed to begin, averting a feared showdown between the police and demonstrators who had vowed to resist any efforts to evict them from their encampment.

The announcement was made by the Bloomberg administration around 6:20 a.m., about 40 minutes before workers were scheduled to enter Zuccotti Park, which has been the home base for the Occupy Wall Street demonstrators angered by what they see as an unfair and corrupt financial system.

“Late last night, we received notice from the owners of Zuccotti Park — Brookfield Properties — that they are postponing their scheduled cleaning of the park, and for the time being withdrawing their request from earlier in the week for police assistance during their cleaning operation,” Deputy Mayor Caswell F. Holloway said in a statement.

More at the link.

So, the Overly Wet Snuggies crowd decides to camp out and complain about the wicked corporations which manufactured the clothing they wore, the tents in which they slept, the cell phones and iPods and laptops and electronic games they used, processed and transported the food they ate and provided jobs for the parents who are still supporting them, and when the city decides that it will spend extra money to clean up the mess they’ve made, they want to stay there and continue to wallow in it.

Dudes and dudettes: the city is trying to help you here, trying to make your impromptu campground a little less of an open fetid and festering cesspool, and you want to complain about it? Grow the [insert vulgar slang term for sexual intercourse here] up!

Oh, wait: if they actually did GTFU, they’d get up, clean themselves up, and go out and find a job.

15 Comments

  1. And while their parents may still be supporting them, at least a few parents didn’t teach them manners: Coast Guard member spit on near Occupy Boston tents Hat tip to Aaron Worthing.

    The story continues to note that “if the Occupy Boston protests last through October, it could end up costing taxpayers $2 million in Police overtime costs.”

    And then there’s this: Occupy Boston Defines Irony, Causes Cancellation Of Food Drive And Small Business-Heavy Festival. In their zeal to make a statement and somehow do some good, they are hurting the small businesses which provide jobs for so many people and even hurt a canned food drive for the poor.

    They are just fornicating brilliant!

  2. So, the Overly Wet Snuggies crowd decides to camp out and complain about the wicked corporations which manufactured the clothing they wore,

    What clothing does Goldman Sachs manufacture?

    the tents in which they slept,

    Which tents do Goldman Sachs manufacture?

    the cell phones and iPods and laptops and electronic games they used,

    Which brands of these are manufactured by Goldman Sachs?

    processed and transported the food they ate

    What food did Goldman Sachs produce?

    There’s a reason why it’s “Occupy WALL STREET” and not, say “Silicon Valley”. Being the weasel you are, I’m not surprised you ignore that.

  3. There’s a reason why it’s “Occupy WALL STREET” and not, say “Silicon Valley”. Being the weasel you are, I’m not surprised you ignore that.

    This point has been addressed by better writers than me:

    No, the Occupy Wall Street protests are fundamentally about the finance sector and the FIRE economy. The investor class received huge bailouts with virtually no strings attached and no consequences after driving the economy into the ground in 2008.

    Now they’re once again experiencing record profits and bonuses while the rest of the country struggles.

    As I’ve mentioned before, most of these protesters don’t want to upend the US economy and replace it with some sort of socialist dystopia – they just want an economy that actually creates jobs, value, and a decent work place for the rest of America that isn’t living large despite its bad risks and too-big-to-fail failures.

    But you’ll just keep on ly1ng about them, won’t you Dana?

    Actual democracy terrifies authoritarian followers such as yourself.

  4. Oh, wait: if they actually did GTFU, they’d get up, clean themselves up, and go out and find a job.

    If I can interrupt your reflexive sh1tting all over actual Americans for a moment, the real world would like a word or two…

    According to the new 2010 census data released Thursday, the country’s young adult population, made up of mostly 20-somethings and 30-somethings, is one of the worst hit by unemployment and poverty, with the state of the economy having a noticeable impact on their decision to delay marrying and moving out of their parents’ homes.

    An analysis of the new data revealed that young adults face the highest unemployment since World War II and nearly one in five – higher than in any other demographic group — risk living in poverty.

    The AP called young people “the recession’s lost generation.”

    Employment among young adults 16 to 29 was 55.3 percent, down from 67.3 percent in 2000 and the lowest level since the end of World War II. For teenagers, employment stood at less than 30 percent.

    And, of course, this:

    This chart looks like a mistake, but it’s correct. Student loan debt has grown by 511% over this period. In the first quarter of 1999, just $90 billion in student loans were outstanding. As of the second quarter of 2011, that balance had ballooned to $550 billion.

    The chart above is striking for another reason. See that blue line for all other debt but student loans? This wasn’t just any average period in history for household debt. This period included the inflation of a housing bubble so gigantic that it caused the financial sector to collapse and led to the worst recession since the Great Depression. But that other debt growth? It’s dwarfed by student loan growth.

    How does the housing bubble debt compare? If you add together mortgages and revolving home equity, then from the first quarter of 1999 to when housing-related debt peaked in the third quarter of 2008, the sum increased from $3.28 trillion to $9.98 trillion. Over this period, housing-related debt had increased threefold. Meanwhile, over the entire period shown on the chart, the balance of student loans grew by more than 6x. The growth of student loans has been twice as steep — and it’s showing no signs of slowing.*

    But by all means, keep expressing your vindictive little temper tantrums on young adults in America. After all, they’re the ones who are going to determine whether you enjoy your retirement peacefully or get shoved onto an ice-floe to drift off and starve…

    [retrieved - pH]

  5. And another missive from the real world…

    A little while ago, Dana weakly countered to my comment about abandoned houses rotting in the US by trying to say that having them occupied would be just as damaging.

    No. Not really:

    Cleveland — The sight of excavators tearing down vacant buildings has become common in this foreclosure-ravaged city, where the housing crisis hit early and hard. But the story behind the recent wave of demolitions is novel — and cities around the country are taking notice.

    A handful of the nation’s largest banks have begun giving away scores of properties that are abandoned or otherwise at risk of languishing indefinitely and further dragging down already depressed neighborhoods.

    This is happening as tent cities go up in various cities in America. But let’s not question whether this might indicate something fundamentally flawed – it might give w1ngnuts a sad.

  6. “But by all means, keep expressing your vindictive little temper tantrums on young adults in America.”

    That is exactly what these Righties on here do, PiaToR. Their intent is to demonize, instead of praise these protesting individuals who are undergoing unpleasant living conditions in order to exercise their free speech right, being about as American as anyone can possibly be. These Righties have no feelings for the plight of suffering folks, instead they make stuff up and go with it for demonization purposes. Unimpressive!!!

  7. Perry wrote:

    That is exactly what these Righties on here do, PiaToR. Their intent is to demonize, instead of praise these protesting individuals who are undergoing unpleasant living conditions in order to exercise their free speech right, being about as American as anyone can possibly be. These Righties have no feelings for the plight of suffering folks, instead they make stuff up and go with it for demonization purposes. Unimpressive!!

    When I was graduated from the University of Kentucky, in May of 1977, we were in the wonderful economic doldrums of the Carter Administration. I had planned to go on to law school, but I was broke, and law school simply wasn’t a possibility.

    So, there I was, a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and History, looking for a decent job. Alas! Companies just weren’t hiring many new graduates, and while it’s always possible that I presented myself poorly in interviews, I wasn’t among the few that were hired. I went ahead and tried to get into Officer Candidate School, but couldn’t pass the vision test.

    So, did I camp out in the park and protest and whine about it, or did I get my dead ass off the sofa and go out and find what job I could? Yup, you guessed it: I went out and got the job I could. I went out to a construction site, and walked around to the various crews working, and asked for work, and that very day was working. They didn’t care that I had a degree or whether I knew about the Congress of Vienna; they did care whether I could mix block mortar and learn to pour and finish concrete. It wasn’t what I was planning to do with my life, but it was good, honest work.

    Of course, I kept checking the want ads, and there it was, just perfect for me: the position called for a BA in political science. but, there was a catch: it was a CETA position, and the successful candidate had to have been unemployed for the previous six months! It would have been a perfect entry-level position for me with my degree, but because I wasn’t a welfare slacker, I was ineligible for consideration. Yeah, I was pissed off, but I still had to work, and I kept working.

    We have millions upon millions of illegal immigrants working the same kinds of jobs I had to take, immigrants who speak little English, and immigrants who could cause their employers real problems if they get caught. But they have those jobs because the spoiled brats in the park won’t sully their hands to take those jobs. Heaven forfend, they might get callouses if they have to carry blocks or set wall panels.

    Well, that kind of work wasn’t beneath me, and it shouldn’t be beneath them. So, how much respect do I have for them? It shouldn’t be too hard to guess!

  8. Dans sid: “Yeah, I was pissed off, but I still had to work, and I kept working.”

    Really? Now Who wouuld do that?

    “Of course, I kept checking the want ads, and there it was, just perfect for me: the position called for a BA in political science.”

    Wow, How’d you do? Common’ Pho. Perry. How’ed You do? Tell me , who loves America? Pho? Perry? Show me! We love FREEDEOM! And we love America, you don’t. You look for anything that is wrong, we look toward the future.

  9. When I was graduated from the University of Kentucky, in May of 1977, we were in the wonderful economic doldrums of the Carter Administration. I had planned to go on to law school, but I was broke, and law school simply wasn’t a possibility.

    So, there I was, a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and History, looking for a decent job. Alas! Companies just weren’t hiring many new graduates, and while it’s always possible that I presented myself poorly in interviews, I wasn’t among the few that were hired. I went ahead and tried to get into Officer Candidate School, but couldn’t pass the vision test.

    That reminder again, if you can tear yourself away from sh1tting over your fellow Americans for a moment:

    According to the new 2010 census data released Thursday, the country’s young adult population, made up of mostly 20-somethings and 30-somethings, is one of the worst hit by unemployment and poverty, with the state of the economy having a noticeable impact on their decision to delay marrying and moving out of their parents’ homes.

    An analysis of the new data revealed that young adults face the highest unemployment since World War II and nearly one in five – higher than in any other demographic group — risk living in poverty.

    The AP called young people “the recession’s lost generation.”

    Employment among young adults 16 to 29 was 55.3 percent, down from 67.3 percent in 2000 and the lowest level since the end of World War II. For teenagers, employment stood at less than 30 percent.

  10. When I was graduated from the University of Kentucky, in May of 1977, we were in the wonderful economic doldrums of the Carter Administration.

    The unemployment rate in May 1977 was 7.0%.

    Currently, for young adults, 14 percent who are unemployed and seeking work and 23 percent have given up seeking a job.

    But do feel free to continue sh!tt!ng over your fellow Americans. It’s faaaaascinating to see teh true spirit of w1ngnuts so nakedly exposed.

  11. Except, of course, that we now have the situation which existed only slightly back then: we now have illegal immigrants here, working, who are doing jobs which would dirty the sensitive hands of the Overly Wet Snuggies crowd; those jobs could be theirs, if they were willing to take them and actually do the work, because it would be much easier on the employers to have a workforce which spoke English and one which he didn’t have to risk losing, or costing him a fine, if the authorities showed up.

    The illegal immigrants are here because we pretty much asked them to come here, asked by having our citizens being unwilling to do the work the immigrants do.

    When you say that “23 percent have given up seeking a job,” you are mentioning precisely those for whom I have little respect.

  12. Pico, quit with the generalizations unless you go and take a survey. I know several of the Occupy Raleigh protesters, and they all have jobs and are capable of supporting themselves. I also know several unemployed people, and your facile “get a job” talk makes it sound far easier than it actually is. You disagree with the Occupy movement, fine. Show a little respect to those who disagree with you, though.

  13. That is exactly what these Righties on here do, PiaToR. Their intent is to demonize, instead of praise these protesting individuals who are undergoing unpleasant living conditions in order to exercise their free speech right, being about as American as anyone can possibly be.

    IOW, exactly what you, Phoeny, Wheeler, et. al. did to the Tea Party, you loathsome hypocrite.

    Cry me a fucking river.

  14. Pico, quit with the generalizations unless you go and take a survey. I know several of the Occupy Raleigh protesters, and they all have jobs and are capable of supporting themselves. I also know several unemployed people, and your facile “get a job” talk makes it sound far easier than it actually is. You disagree with the Occupy movement, fine. Show a little respect to those who disagree with you, though.

    Where were you, Jeff, telling Phoeny and Perry that during the Tea Party apex?

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