My computer died

The hard drive just crashed, last weekend, while I was reading a comment from the Phoenician; I’m sure it was just a coincidence!

It’s in the ‘puter shop, and I’m using an old desktop that belongs to the younger Miss Pico. It runs Vista, which is an abomination unto the LORD, and it used Internet Explorer instead of Mozilla Firefox for internet connection, and IE is also an abomination.

Well, I’ve installed Firefox now, and I’ll have to add AOL as well. But I want my old computer back!

7 Comments

  1. If I try to use Internet Exploder and close a tab, Internet Exploder crashes. Always has. The only time I use Internet Exploder is on sites that have programs (I guess that’s what they’re called) that are not supported by Firefox. And then it’s only because I need to accomplish something on those information-gathering sites. Prior to the advent of Mozilla, I used Netscrape to avoid Internet Exploder.

  2. It’s in the ‘puter shop, and I’m using an old desktop that belongs to the younger Miss Pico. It runs Vista, which is an abomination unto the LORD, and it used Internet Explorer instead of Mozilla Firefox for internet connection, and IE is also an abomination. >dp

    ++++++++++++++++

    I suggest that you download and burn yourself a linux-live cd — will never break or get a virus no matter where you surf. Most will come with Firefox and Thunderbird already installed. Visit http://www.distrowatch.com and choose from a hundred or so. They’re all completely free.

    I particularly like one named PCLinuxOS — enter that name into the search box at top left and choose a download site.

    In case ‘linux-live cd’ doesn’t register, that is a complete configured OS on a cd, does not require a hard disk to boot and run. Though if you like it, it can easily be installed to hard disk, takes about 20 minutes.

    Or if you want to start smaller [maybe 120mb vs 690mb for the PCL], can’t do much better than Pmagic — it will have Firefox, and also a bunch of backup imaging utilities, with which you can do your own rescues for free the next time something crashes.

    What you’ll download is an ‘iso’ file — tell your burner app that it is a cd ‘image’, not a data disk. Once burned, restart your computer with it in the drive, choose to boot from the cd, and away it goes. Slower boot than a hd install, but not that bad, maybe 2 minutes.

    I bought a trinket just the other day to backup a win7 laptop here — a Seagate external disk from newegg — 320mb, runs completely from the power available from a usb port, cost $40.00. That’s big enough to store backup images from a bunch of computers, or to store whatever else needs saving.

    I always take along a linux live when I travel — have had hard disk problems a couple times on the road, the linux cd will keep you in touch.

  3. And re the linux iso, I’ll add that it can also be run from a flash drive, or even an SD card. I particularly like SD cuz those have a write-protect switch.

  4. I bought RedHat Linux (I think it was) once and followed the directions to install it alongside Windows (whatever that’s called). After trying it out, I decided I didn’t know enough about computing to use it. So I switched back to Windows.

  5. I have Linux on my Netbook, and Vista on my Laptop. I must say I do like Linux for the most part, and it takes up much less room on your computer. It has Firefox with it, but you can also download a Chrome browser, or Google Chrome. Burninbush has way more computer savvy than I do, but it was really easy to load. I’ve done it twice. Once because I have no idea what happened, but I was looking at a black screen, and again when Linux had an upgraded version. Really easy, I loaded the OS onto a flashdrive. If I can do it, anyone can.
    IE9 on my laptop is frequently freezing—I’d like to uninstall it altogether. I also run Google chrome on it. My preferred browser is Chrome…although I do hear interesting things about Thunderbird.

  6. Really easy, I loaded the OS onto a flashdrive. If I can do it, anyone can.
    IE9 on my laptop is frequently freezing—I’d like to uninstall it altogether. I also run Google chrome on it. My preferred browser is Chrome…although I do hear interesting things about Thunderbird. >kld

    +++++++++++++++++++

    Thunderbird is an email client, a sort of twin sister to Firefox. What you were referring to above is commonly called ‘dual-booting’ — windows and linux on the same disk.

    I’m just purely fascinated by the notion of an OS that can’t be broken by viruses or malware, or even by a disk failure, or even by common stupidity; push the reset button and everything unscrews itself. Play with a linux live for a while, and then linux grows on you and you wind up installing 5 or 10 versions on multiple computers, LOL. It’s free, why not?

    I still have a version of windows on each puter here, but for the last 8 years or so I’ve run linux 90% of the time, even to the extent of running windows programs under an emulator. Linux [with KDE] even looks about the same as windows these days.

    Definitely, a flash disk is a good media choice if you have one, _and_ have a computer that is able to boot from a usb device — not all will. Linux will boot faster from a usb device than from a cd — maybe 30 – 40 seconds. Loaded coresident onto your hard disk [easy] then boot is even faster.

  7. BB suggested:

    I suggest that you download and burn yourself a linux-live cd — will never break or get a virus no matter where you surf. Most will come with Firefox and Thunderbird already installed. Visit http://www.distrowatch.com and choose from a hundred or so. They’re all completely free.

    I just might do that when I get my computer back; I’m not going to mess with my daughter’s computer — even though she still has a laptop at college — right now.

    For those who don’t know him, BB is the computer geekiest of (retired) computer geeks.

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