8 Comments

  1. Typical HS teaching day for me teaching chemistry was: 0700 to 1730, 2030 to 2230(at home). Then add to that typically 6 weekend hours (at home), and you have a pretty long work week of about 66 hours. I had 2 preps for five classes per day/140 students, not unusual for a chemistry teacher at that time in that school district.

    Few folks realize what it takes to be an effective teacher! Ask Hube!

  2. That’s pretty impressive for a teacher Perry. Was that because you taught chemistry or is that the norm for all subjects?

  3. “That’s pretty impressive for a teacher Perry. Was that because you taught chemistry or is that the norm for all subjects?”

    I’d say it is both subject and teacher dependent, Hoagie. Since the sciences have labs to put up and take down, that adds additional prep and time. English, Language, and History teachers have a particularly heavy load with grading. Elementary teachers have heavy prep requirements added on to a day with little free time for prep. Most teachers have extra responsibilities regarding remediation time after school, sponsoring clubs, coaching sports, meeting/communicating with parents, …. In the summer teachers take courses in their subject areas for improvement and to meet licensing requirements. Nowadays it is not uncommon for at teacher to have to teach a related course, like in my case to teach a physics or biology or earth sciences section, thus requiring yet another prep for that year.

    And then there is classroom management, but that’s for another time. Maybe Hube might have some comments on that topic.

    It’s quite challenging, but the personal rewards are huge, right Hube?

  4. It’s quite challenging, but the personal rewards are huge, right Hube?

    Indeed. However, in out “lovely” state, the challenges may soon become insurmountable for your average teacher. I’ve never seen such a number of teachers who’ve basically had it with the job. Would love to post more on this now, but it’ll have to wait.

  5. So let me get this straight Hube, They ( the teachers ) supposidly teach, and they are not paid enough? Frankly, if thry worked for mr I’d phuckin’ fire’em. But then again, I’m a bad boy.

  6. So let me get this straight Hube, They ( the teachers ) supposidly teach, and they are not paid enough? Frankly, if thry worked for mr I’d phuckin’ fire’em.

    I think that’s a damne good idea. Fire every American teacher – if kids wanna learn, let them do it on the Internet. Leave education to namby-pambies like the Europeans and the Chinese.

  7. So let me get this straight Hube, They ( the teachers ) supposidly teach, and they are not paid enough? Frankly, if thry worked for mr I’d phuckin’ fire’em. But then again, I’m a bad boy.

    Where did I say that, Hoagie? You do realize that about 40% of the NEA is made up of right-leaning individuals … like myself?

    Here’s what I meant: With DE accepting Race to the Top money, it comes with a LOT of strings attached. There’s more high-stakes testing (more than before, which was bad enough), teachers being required to do a lot more (for the same pay), but most silly of all teachers are being “graded” in large measure by the results of these high stakes tests. The funny part about that is, aside from reading, writing and math, kids aren’t tested (via the high-stakes tests) in any other subject. Yet, my evaluation, and many others’ will be based on our schools results in those subject areas. Is that a fair evaluation system, Hoagie? I teach Spanish, but my professional evaluation (in part) will be based on my school’s reading, writing and math test scores — subjects I do not teach. That make sense?

    And this is not to mention that more and more burden is placed on the teacher — or “fault,” if you will — for “results” when 1) parenting is becoming less and less evident, 2) more kids simply say “F you, I ain’t doing this”, and 3) disruptive kids have more rights that kids there to learn. If I go to the doctor for an ailment and his instructions are to take a pill twice a day for 10 days, but I do not do this and hence my condition worsens, whose fault is that? Right — mine. But in the logic-world of teaching, it would be the doctor’s.

    Look, I get that teachers need to be creative and learn how to extrinsically motivate students. All good teachers do that. But, again, as those factors I noted above increase year to year — and now we’re being graded on student progress (in areas which we do not teach) — how much will it take before there’s either a total teacher burnout, or he/she simply throws up their hands and walks away?

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