2½ times better

I have noted, many times, that the Democrat-controlled eleventy-first Congress didn’t do its primary job of passing the government appropriations bills for FY2011, didn’t pass any of them, requiring the government to be financed via a series of continuing resolutions. Nor did the 111th Congress even pass an overall budget; it just never happened.

Well, with the end of FY2011 approaching in just 3½ weeks, it’s fair to ask how the eleventy-second Congress is doing.

H.R.2017 : Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2012:

5/26/2011 Introduced in House
5/26/2011 The House Committee on Appropriations reported an original measure, H. Rept. 112-91, by Mr. Aderholt.
6/2/2011 Passed/agreed to in House: On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 231 – 188 (Roll no. 409).
6/6/2011 Referred to Senate committee: Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

H.R.2055 : Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012

5/31/2011 Introduced in House
5/31/2011 The House Committee on Appropriations reported an original measure, H. Rept. 112-94, by Mr. Culberson.
6/14/2011 Passed/agreed to in House: On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 411 – 5 (Roll no. 418).
6/30/2011 Committee on Appropriations. Reported by Senator Johnson SD, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute. With written report No. 112-29.
7/20/2011 Passed/agreed to in Senate: Passed Senate with an amendment by Yea-Nay. 97 – 2. Record Vote Number: 115.
7/20/2011 Resolving differences — Senate actions: Senate insists on its amendment, asks for a conference, appoints conferees Johnson SD; Inouye; Landrieu; Murray; Reed; Nelson NE; Pryor; Tester; Leahy; Kirk; Hutchison; McConnell; Murkowski; Blunt; Hoeven; Coats; Cochran.

H.R.2112 : Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012

6/3/2011 Introduced in House
6/3/2011 The House Committee on Appropriations reported an original measure, H. Rept. 112-101, by Mr. Kingston.
6/16/2011 Passed/agreed to in House: On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 217 – 203 (Roll no. 459).
6/16/2011 Referred to Senate committee: Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

H.R.2219 : Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2012

6/16/2011 Introduced in House
6/16/2011 The House Committee on Appropriations reported an original measure, H. Rept. 112-110, by Mr. Young (FL).
7/8/2011 Passed/agreed to in House: On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 336 – 87 (Roll no. 532).
7/11/2011 Referred to Senate committee: Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

H.R.2434 : Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act, 2012

7/7/2011 Introduced in House
7/7/2011 The House Committee on Appropriations reported an original measure, H. Rept. 112-136, by Mrs. Emerson.
7/7/2011 Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 86.

H.R.2551 : Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2012

7/15/2011 Introduced in House
7/15/2011 The House Committee on Appropriations reported an original measure, H. Rept. 112-148, by Mr. Crenshaw.
7/22/2011 Passed/agreed to in House: On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 252 – 159 (Roll no. 629).
7/22/2011 Referred to Senate committee: Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Appropriations.

H.R.2584 : Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012

7/19/2011 Introduced in House
7/19/2011 The House Committee on Appropriations reported an original measure, H. Rept. 112-151, by Mr. Simpson.
7/28/2011 House floor actions: Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union rises leaving H.R. 2584 as unfinished business.

H.R.2596 : Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012

7/20/2011 Introduced in House
7/20/2011 The House Committee on Appropriations reported an original measure, H. Rept. 112-169, by Mr. Wolf.
7/20/2011 Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 113.

Clearly, the Republican-controlled House of Representatives has not yet finished its work on the budget and appropriations. I had written, months ago, that the unfinished work from the previous Congress would probably cause the current one to spend too much time finishing FY2011 to get the FY2012 budget and appropriations bills done on time.

But the House of Representatives of the 111th Congress passed only two of the twelve annual appropriations bills by the beginning of FY2011, and the Senate had passed none at all. At least in the 112th Congress, the Republican-controlled House has passed five of them, and there are still 3½ weeks left in FY2011. I guess that makes them 2½ times better than the House in the last Congress.

Not that that’s saying a lot. :(

7 Comments

  1. But the House of Representatives of the 111th Congress passed only two of the twelve annual appropriations bills by the beginning of FY2011, and the Senate had passed none at all. At least in the 112th Congress, the Republican-controlled House has passed five of them, and there are still 3½ weeks left in FY2011. I guess that makes them 2½ times better than the House in the last Congress

    Or the minority party 2 1/2 time more as obstructive and delaying…

  2. The US Senate has not passed a federal budget in over 855 days. The US Senate has not even attempted to work on a federal budget in over 2 years. All that time, the Democrats have been in charge of the US Senate. Harry Reid (D – NV) has declared he will not work on passing a budget, despite Federal Law mandating such. In 2010, neither House of Congress even tried to pass a federal budget, despite Federal Law mandating such. In 2010, both Houses of Congress had very large Democrat majorities.

    If the Democrats refused to even attempt a budget in 2010 and the Democrat Senate refused to even attempt a budget in 2011, that’s not on the Republicans. That’s on the Democrats. And it’s a direct and intentional violation of Federal Law.

  3. Phoe, the minority party has no power to obstruct anything in the House of representatives. The House Rules Committee, controlled by the majority, sets the agenda, and the votes, and the time schedule.

  4. Phoe, the minority party has no power to obstruct anything in the House of representatives.

    Hedrick Smith says otherwise.

    Which implies that you’ve taken up the favourite activity of your fellow w1ngnuts, and started blatently lying.

  5. And how does Hedrick Smith say that this is done? The Rules Committee sets the times for votes, and the time allotted for amendments, debate, etc. Each side is allotted a specific amount of time for debate, if they wish to use it. But, other than maximizing the amount of time they have for debate and offering amendments, the minority party cannot prevent a vote from being taken.

    Now, if the minority can persuade a sufficient number of members of the majority party to side with them on an issue, then they can defeat it on the floor, but that’s not obstructionism.

Comments are closed.