Link Love

Greening us back to the dark ages

The newly-mandated CFL bulbs are difficult enough to dispose of let alone clean up should you break one (more on that later), it turns out the Curly Fry Lights may not even be safe to turn on.

Now, while you are busy not turning on your CFL and waiting hopefully in the dark for an incandescent bulb black market to emerge and you happen to break one of your CFLs, what to do?

As a public service, BwD has provided not just the link but the full text of clean-up procedures as outlined by the federal Environmental Protection Agency:

CFLs may be hazardous to your health while in use. CFLs may be hazardous to your health if broken. EPA has a very long multi-step process of disposing of broken CFLs. CFLs are more hazardous to the environment upon disposal than incandescents. Good thing government is requiring CFLs and banning incandescents. Right? RIGHT?

Obama calls Americans SLUGS? He meant SLOBs!!!

Dear Friends: Big Government is reporting that CBS is not releasing the complete open-mic tape that caught Obama ranting against Paul Ryan. Specifically: People can speculate as to what their motive is, but we suspect that they do not want to jeopardize their White House access leading into campaign season by being the ones to release the audio of His Presidency referring to Americans as “slugs.”

Wouldn’t want the lamestream media sycophants like CBS to release newsworthy inflammatory statements uttered by Teh Won now, would we? It’s not like the LA Slimes has been sitting on a damaging videotape of Obama praising terrorist Rashid Khalidi since before his election, right? Well, about that…

Tax the Rich… Classic Class Envy

The idea that the wealthy ought to pay more in taxes, IE: a higher marginal rate, is simply morally wrong. The belief that those who are more successful economical should be taxed at a much higher rate {in other words punished for their success) defies objective logic. It is the product of class envy and is the rallying cry of the progressive socialists and neo Marxist in our society.

Class-envy is a sin, thus always wrong.

Donald Trump’s eminent-domain empire
(See also Donald Trump and the Little Pink House: Is Trump really a conservative? and here.)

Too many mega-developers like Trump have achieved success by using and abusing the government’s ability to commandeer private property for purported “public use.” Invoking the Fifth Amendment takings clause, real estate moguls, parking garage builders, mall developers and sports palace architects have colluded with elected officials to pull off legalized theft in the name of reducing “blight.” Under eminent domain, the definition of “public purpose” has been stretched like Silly Putty to cover everything from roads and bridges to high-end retail stores, baseball stadiums and casinos.

While casting himself as America’s new constitutional savior, Trump has shown reckless disregard for fundamental private property rights. In the 1990s, he waged a notorious war on elderly homeowner Vera Coking, who owned a little home in Atlantic City that stood in the way of Trump’s manifest land development. The real estate mogul was determined to expand his Trump Plaza and build a limo parking lot — Coking’s private property be damned. The nonprofit Institute for Justice, which successfully saved Coking’s home, explained the confiscatory scheme:

“Unlike most developers, Donald Trump doesn’t have to negotiate with a private owner when he wants to buy a piece of property, because a governmental agency — the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority or CRDA — will get it for him at a fraction of the market value, even if the current owner refuses to sell. Here is how the process works.

The Donald is no Conservative. But he’s wooing Conservatives. His credentials get exposed enough and he’s a sinking ship. But he is a loud voice of opposition to Obama on multiple fronts, and the lamestream media has to deal with him.

Fixing California – A Reform Agenda

California transfers about 71% of its state revenue to local governments. Because the money comes from the state, local administrators no longer have much incentive to spend it efficiently.

Oof. That can’t be good. All that extra bureaucracy siphoning off tax dollars.

Somehow (it) Made it More Menacing

Hopefully, at some point, you’ve gotten to know someone who just has the bearing. Their body language has a low, implied growl that suggests they’re perfectly able to deal with anything you might dish out, and even after taking a punch they’re still steady.

Once you get to know them, you might learn that they just hate fighting and figured out that the “I can and will kill you” stance prevents most of those (and getting it over as quickly as possible fixes the rest).

If you are not afraid to project power in self-defense, chances are you will almost never have to actually defend yourself.

About China’s high-speed rail edge ….

The vaunted high-speed rail project pushed by Beijing has collapsed into a morass of embezzlement and failure (via Jonah Goldberg):

For the past eight years, Liu Zhijun was one of the most influential people in China. As minister of railways, Liu ran China’s $300?billion high-speed rail project. U.S., European and Japanese contractors jostled for a piece of the business while foreign journalists gushed over China’s latest high-tech marvel.

Today, Liu Zhijun is ruined, and his high-speed rail project is in trouble. On Feb. 25, he was fired for “severe violations of discipline” — code for embezzling tens of millions of dollars. Seems his ministry has run up $271?billion in debt — roughly five times the level that bankrupted General Motors. But ticket sales can’t cover debt service that will total $27.7?billion in 2011 alone. Safety concerns also are cropping up.

But hey, the trains still run on time, don’t they? Not exactly:

Faced with a financial and public relations disaster, China put the brakes on Liu’s program. On April 13, the government cut bullet-train speeds 30 mph to improve safety, energy efficiency and affordability. The Railway Ministry’s tangled finances are being audited. Construction plans, too, are being reviewed.

Liu’s legacy, in short, is a system that could drain China’s economic resources for years. So much for the grand project that Thomas Friedman of the New York Times likened to a “moon shot” and that President Obama held up as a model for the United States.

Even with substandard materials and shoddy construction, the system faces annual shortfalls of billions of dollars. Now the system runs a lot slower, although the price isn’t likely to decline, and bus service will look better and better to the working class the high-speed rail was supposed to serve.

Based on a comparison of China’s 2008 GDP and US 2008 GDP, that 300 Billion China budgeted to create the high-speed passenger rail would be equivalent to the US budgeting 933 Billion. On a ginormous government financial sink-hole that runs Billions in debt annually. And China had to slow down the trains to make them more economical and energy efficient, but still a financial sink-hole.

12 Comments

  1. When I have a CFL which burns out — something which happens far more often than we were told would be the case — I simply throw it in the trash. They aren’t broken, but I’m sure that they get crushed in the landfill, if not broken in the garbage truck.

  2. What to Do if a Compact Fluorescent Light (CFL) Bulb or Fluorescent Tube Light Bulb Breaks in Your Home: Detailed Recommendations

    View the most important steps to reduce exposure to mercury vapor from a broken bulb

    Before Cleanup

    • Have people and pets leave the room, and avoid the breakage area on the way out.
    • Open a window or door to the outdoors and leave the room for 5-10 minutes.
    • Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning (H&AC) system, if you have one.
    • Collect materials you will need to clean up the broken bulb:
      • Stiff paper or cardboard
      • Sticky tape (e.g., duct tape)
      • Damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes (for hard surfaces)
      • Glass jar with a metal lid (such as a canning jar) or a sealable plastic bag(s)

    Cleanup Steps for Hard Surfaces

    • Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag. (NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.)
    • Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
    • Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes. Place the towels in the glass jar or plastic bag.
    • Vacuuming of hard surfaces during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
      • Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
      • Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available; and
      • Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
    • Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of properly.
      • Check with your local or state government about disposal requirements in your area. Some states and communities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center.
    • Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
    • Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the HVAC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.

    Cleanup Steps for Carpeting or Rugs

    • Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag. (NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.)
    • Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
    • Vacuuming of carpeting or rugs during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
      • Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
      • Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available, and
      • Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
    • Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of properly.
      • Check with your local or state government about disposal requirements in your area. Some states and communities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center.
    • Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
    • Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the HVAC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.

    Top of Page

    Future Cleaning of Carpeting or Rugs: Air Out the Room During and After Vacuuming

    • The next several times you vacuum the rug or carpet, shut off the HVAC system if you have one, close the doors to other rooms, and open a window or door to the outside before vacuuming. Change the vacuum bag after each use in this area.
    • After vacuuming is completed, keep the HVAC system shut off and the window or door to the outside open, as practical, for several hours.

    Top of Page

    Actions You Can Take to Prevent Broken Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    Fluorescent bulbs are made of glass and can break if dropped or roughly handled. To avoid breaking a bulb, follow these general practices:
    • Always switch off and allow a working CFL bulb to cool before handling.
    • Always handle CFL bulbs carefully to avoid breakage.
      • If possible, screw/unscrew the CFL by holding the plastic or ceramic base, not the glass tubing.
      • Gently screw in the CFL until snug. Do not over-tighten.
      • Never forcefully twist the glass tubing.
    • Consider not using CFLs in lamps that can be easily knocked over, in unprotected light fixtures, or in lamps that are incompatible with the spiral or folded shape of many CFLs.
    • Do not use CFL bulbs in locations where they can easily be broken, such as play spaces.
    • Use CFL bulbs that have a glass or plastic cover over the spiral or folded glass tube, if available. These types of bulbs look more like incandescent bulbs and may be more durable if dropped.
    • Consider using a drop cloth (e.g., plastic sheet or beach towel) when changing a fluorescent light bulb in case a breakage should occur. The drop cloth will help prevent mercury contamination of nearby surfaces and can be bundled with the bulb debris for disposal.
  3. From Dana: What to Do if a Compact Fluorescent Light (CFL) Bulb or Fluorescent Tube Light Bulb Breaks in Your Home: Detailed Recommendations

    Is the CFL mandate a gift to trial lawyers? It’s not at all difficult to imagine the billions of dollars in lawsuits this ill-considered mandate will inspire.

    Just think of the potential for increased medical costs for those who suffer the effects of mercury poisoning after breaking those horrendous CFL bulbs. Is this a way for BO to tout his equally horrendous ObamaCare?

    Will left-handed people like me, who are generally a little bit clumsy anyway, be rationed out of government care because we represent such a high risk for CFL breakage and, therefore, too great a risk in the overall coverage picture?

    This CFL nonsense is yet more evidence that community organizers make lousy, incompetent and inept presidents.

  4. I use the CFLs at home, and, naturally, I throw them in the regular trash when the fail. And with the government moving to ban the completely trustworthy, non-polluting incandescent bulbs, and CFLs causing a pollution hazard, next they’ll mandate that we get rid of CFLs and go with light emitting diode lamps. Of course, the LED bulbs cost between $30 and $50 apiece right now, but who cares about imposing costs like that on the proletariat?

  5. As for high-speed rail, we already have high-speed rail service in the United States, Amtrak’s Acela service in the Northeast Corridor, and it does make money, about $41 per passenger.

    But Amtrak as a whole loses about $32 per passenger, and has to be heavily subsidized. There’s no particular reason to believe that expanding Acela service outside of the densely-populated northeast would be a profitable or even break-even proposition. The private railroads don’t seem to think that there’d be any profit in it for them, or they’d be moving toward such service themselves.

  6. Who says that high speed rail has to be profitable right away?

    There is a tradition of high speed rail in Japan and Europe, with the Chinese signing on to it. Thus, there is significant experience and thought behind the use of high speed rail displacing shorter distance air, because air is more expensive, less efficient re use of fuel, and takes less elapsed time from start (home) to finish (hotel or office).

  7. “I use the CFLs at home, and, naturally, I throw them in the regular trash when the fail.”

    Sounds like something you would do, Dana! You do know that there are safe ways available to you to dispose of CFL’s. But nevermind, you will do what you please anyway. It’s something like wearing seat belts, when not doing so is a potential sacrifice of your family’s dependencies on your being healthy and living. Contamination of the environment with mercury is being neglectful of one’s responsibilities in a similar sort of way, in my opinion. The key word is “neglect”, or maybe ego, or stubbornness, has something to do with it too, no?

  8. Perry wrote:

    Who says that high speed rail has to be profitable right away?

    Had you followed the internal link, you’d have seen this line:

    Passenger rail systems throughout the world lose money and require government subsidies to cover operating expenses. Read about it here.

    There’s a real difference between not being profitable right away and endlessly requiring subsidies. Amtrak, in its history, has never reached even the break even point, much less been profitable, and continuing government subsidies are the norm worldwide.

    Although it would certainly be desirable if Amtrak operated in the black, are you suggesting that since they don’t, that we should abandon Amtrak? I see no problem in subsidizing Amtrak, if that is required. Should we disband the Postal Service also. How about building highways and bridges? How about maintaining highways and bridges?

    Moreover, we subsidize airlines and air travel in more ways than most can imagine: Read about it here.

    “As I’ve been writing about for years, airlines whine about “regulations” and “freedom of the skies”, but it in fact they receive a wide range of subsidies, tax preferences, and other forms of special treatment from Federal, state, and local governments in the USA. (The phenomenon is widespread elsewhere in the world, even if the details vary from country to country.)”

    How is subsidizing Amtrak out of place? I don’t understand!

  9. Japan’s high-speed rail loses money every year. From what I understand, France’s high-speed rail loses money every year. It is not an economic benefit but rather an economic drag.

  10. “Japan’s high-speed rail loses money every year. From what I understand, France’s high-speed rail loses money every year. It is not an economic benefit but rather an economic drag.”

    Even if you are correct, John, and I suspect you are, the criterion for some specific public infrastructure should be whether it is required, not whether it may require to be subsidized. And as I mentioned to Dana, we subsidize airlines, airports, airplane manufacture, and more.

  11. the criterion for some specific public infrastructure should be whether it is required

    There is no requirement for Big Government boondoggles like high-speed rail. No requirement at all, except to buy votes.

  12. John, thanks for the link.

    I admire Dana’s dogged persistence even in the face of overwhelming evidence. CFLs suck. I just don’t know how else to put it.

    Be checking your blog out from here on.

Comments are closed.