In Which I Praise The Union Protesters

I relish the opportunity to attack the unions. I do so with regularity. But on this point, I have to sing their praises. The Rhode Island protesters done good. Michelle Malkin has the story.

At AFSCME’s “solidarity” rally in Providence, Rhode Island on Tuesday, a cameraman was accosted by a fuming pro-union protester. The cameraman had his back to the goon, who appears to accost him unprovoked. The goon screams:

“I’ll f**k you in the ass, you faggot!”

His shouting escalates and other union supporters try to intervene as he threatened the cameraman, but he continues to foam at the mouth.

The “solidarity” mob finally starts chanting “Hey, hey, ho, ho, union-busting’s got to go” to drown out the goon’s snit fit. He yells that he will “follow you out of here.”

The eruption starts at 7:32 in this video.

That goon was out of control. That goon was violent. That goon was criminal. And that goon got arrested and charged.

But it was the rest of them that deserve praise. The crowd tried to calm him down. When that didn’t work, they separated him from the cameramen who were obviously there to record “the enemy” in action. And then they began loudly chanting their spiel to drown him out. The kerfuffle interrupted the speechifying as the police were brought in to deal with the goon. And then the emcee stepped up and gave a very appropriate caution to the crowd.

This is what I like to see. A large crowd of boisterous protesters peacefully protesting and properly policing the goons within. I disagree with just about everything the union protesters are pushing — because it’s wrong for society — but I support their right to boisterously do so, peacefully. They done good.

24 Comments

  1. Well, the discourteous protestor was just obviously a right-wing plant, paid by Andrew Breitbart, to make it seem as though the peaceful union protestors were not so peaceful.

    I’m surprised you didn’t realize that.

  2. A shining ray of reason. Gives me a little hope.

    Unlike this Onion story, which offers a glimpse of non-insanity from an alternate universe… but I know it’s only fiction.

    http://www.theonion.com/articles/embarrassed-republicans-admit-theyve-been-thinking,19248/

    “It’s absolutely mortifying to suddenly realize that the man you had long credited as a champion of fiscal conservatism actually tripled the national debt and signed the largest peacetime tax hike in U.S. history,” said former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, adding that he was ashamed to learn that the man he once called his hero stood by silently while the AIDS epidemic exploded.

  3. The entire exercise of “protesting” has become a silly charade, a melodrama for the media, and an opportunity for ignorant louts to misbehave in public.

    In Wisconsin, the protesters aren’t about to even consider the possibility their antics are exposing them as greedy, self-serving, jerks. Increasingly, the public sees them as overpaid, ungrateful, and unfit for the jobs they’re fortunate to have and because of their selfish refusal face fiscal realities are now in danger of losing.

  4. ropelight: “…greedy…”

    The union agreed with all of Walker’s financial demands. Nobody in this issue is thinking about money.

    Then again… if greed is bad… you must hate all CEO’s and bankers and investors and “productive” people in society, right, ropelight?

  5. Yes, greedy! Union pigs pay only 1/5th of one penny toward their retirement pensions, and taxpayers pay 99.8%, and that’s in addition to a wage structure more generous than private sector employment. On top of that, the union pigs only pay 1/4th of the going rate for health care insurance, and guess who pays the balance?

    Greedy public sector union bosses spend millions to elect Democrats to office, then those bought and paid for politicians sign sweetheart union contracts with union fat cats for the kind of benefits described above and stick taxpayers for the tab. That’s greed times ten, and nearly 7 out of every 10 Americans can see it, clear as a bell.

  6. “The entire exercise of “protesting” has become a silly charade, a melodrama for the media, and an opportunity for ignorant louts to misbehave in public.

    In Wisconsin, the protesters aren’t about to even consider the possibility their antics are exposing them as greedy, self-serving, jerks. Increasingly, the public sees them as overpaid, ungrateful, and unfit for the jobs they’re fortunate to have and because of their selfish refusal face fiscal realities are now in danger of losing.”

    Nangleator is correct, ropelight, as your misapplication of the greed label is very telling about your prejudices and biases. Your true colors are showing loudly and clearly, which we regulars on here already knew quite well!!!

    We now know that we have a dictatorially and conspiratorially minded Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker who is attempting to lead an attack on public workers’ right to negotiate, that is, public employees’ unions, in consort with other Republican Governors.

    Interestingly, most of the other Governors have begun to back off as their strategy has begun to backfire politically.

  7. Worked out better than the SEIU goons last year and the goon that put a hurtin’ on person half his size. Real brave of the gooney bird. This was better that the union policed itself.

  8. “Well, the discourteous protestor was just obviously a right-wing plant, paid by Andrew Breitbart, to make it seem as though the peaceful union protestors were not so peaceful.

    I’m surprised you didn’t realize that.”

    That’s probably true, as we now can see by virtue of the faux Koch phone call! Governor Walker was caught red-handed, so now his face is really red!! :)

  9. Naggy, greedy union parasites owe the taxpayers much more than just a temporary pause in their gluttonous pillaging of private sector workers paychecks.

    Crocodile tears, sympathetic words, and a few crumbs from the “collective bargaining” feast aren’t going to make up for years and years of greed and political corruption. Nothing short of a complete and permanent ban on public employee unions will do to make sure corrupt union thugs operating in cahoots with crooked Democrat politicians never again subverts elections and results in wholesale looting of the public treasury.

  10. Well, so much for your good-natured attempt to toss the left a bone …

    Dana and I both wrote separate articles close together chronologically where we refused to condemn Obama for certain things, in fact we said he did right. That does not impact the venomous hate and lies of the left — on this board or anywhere else — but that’s not why we wrote those articles in the first place.

    Right’s right. And when we see leftists doing right, we say so. And that’s the point, really. It’s not a popularity gimmick or a “please like me” gimmick. I would rather be right than popular. That’s my overriding philosophy. Let spineless cretins seek false praise and fair-weather friends. It’s all whitewash on filthy sepulchres full of dead men’s bones.

  11. Yes, greedy! Union pigs pay only 1/5th of one penny toward their retirement pensions, and taxpayers pay 99.8%, and that’s in addition to a wage structure more generous than private sector employment. On top of that, the union pigs only pay 1/4th of the going rate for health care insurance, and guess who pays the balance?

    Uh-huh

    The data analysis in this paper, however, indicate that public employees, both state and local government, are not overpaid. Comparisons controlling for education, experience, hours of work, organizational size, gender, race, ethnicity and disability, reveal no significant overpayment but a slight undercompensation of public employees when compared to private employee compensation costs on a per hour basis. On average, full-time state and local employees are undercompensated by 3.7%, in comparison to otherwise similar private-sector workers. The public employee compensation penalty is smaller for local government employees (1.8%) than state government workers (7.6%).

    There are, however, substantially different approaches to staffing and compensation between the private and public sectors. On average, state and local public-sector workers are more highly educated than the private-sector workforce; 54% of full-time state and local public sector workers hold at least a four year college degree compared to 35% of full-time private-sector workers. State and local governments pay college-educated labor on average 25% less than private employers. The earnings differential is greatest for professional employees, lawyers, and doctors. On the other hand, the public sector appears to set a floor on compensation. The compensation of workers with a high school education is higher for state or local government employees, when compared to similarly educated
    workers in the private sector.

    Benefits are also allocated differently between privateand public-sector full-time workers in the United States. State and local government employees receive a higher portion of their compensation in the form of employer provided benefits, and the mix of benefits is different from the private sector. Some benefits are more generous in the public sector, but it is a serious error to imagine that comparability requires that each and every element of compensation is the same. What is important when considering both the employer-provided benefits and direct pay is whether state and local government workers have a total compensation package that costs what they would receive if employed in the private sector. It is the total cost of the compensation package—not the mix of cash and benefits—that is important in making a comparison.

    I see ropelight has been swallowing the Fox News Kool Aid again.

  12. “I see ropelight has been swallowing the Fox News Kool Aid again.”

    Without question! And he makes stuff up too!!

  13. So, Perry, are your opinions independent of your own selfish interests, or are your own “prejudices and biases” on display here?

    Are you one of the greedy union pigs taking food out of the mouths of children while their parents are stuck in low wage jobs working to provide you and your fellow retired union parasites a cushy pension?

  14. Really Bad Reporting in Wisconsin: Who ‘Contributes’ to Public Workers’ Pensions?

    When it comes to improving public understanding of tax policy, nothing has been more troubling than the deeply flawed coverage of the Wisconsin state employees’ fight over collective bargaining.

    Economic nonsense is being reported as fact in most of the news reports on the Wisconsin dispute, the product of a breakdown of skepticism among journalists multiplied by their lack of understanding of basic economic principles.

    Gov. Scott Walker says he wants state workers covered by collective bargaining agreements to “contribute more” to their pension and health insurance plans.

    Accepting Gov. Walker’ s assertions as fact, and failing to check, created the impression that somehow the workers are getting something extra, a gift from taxpayers. They are not.

    Out of every dollar that funds Wisconsin’ s pension and health insurance plans for state workers, 100 cents comes from the state workers.
    [...]
    The fact is that all of the money going into these plans belongs to the workers because it is part of the compensation of the state workers. The fact is that the state workers negotiate their total compensation, which they then divvy up between cash wages, paid vacations, health insurance and, yes, pensions. Since the Wisconsin government workers collectively bargained for their compensation, all of the compensation they have bargained for is part of their pay and thus only the workers contribute to the pension plan. This is an indisputable fact.

    Are you one of the greedy union pigs taking food out of the mouths of children while their parents are stuck in low wage jobs working to provide you and your fellow retired union parasites a cushy pension?

    How Washington Made the Rich Richer–and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class [excerpt]

    As everybody knows, the rich have gotten a lot richer in recent decades while most Americans haven’t. But how, in the land of opportunity and shared prosperity, can that be? In a word: politics. So Jacob Hacker and Paul Pierson argue, quite persuasively, in their new book Winner-Take-All Politics. Starting in the 1970s, they show, Big Business and conservative ideologues got organized and saw to a wholesale rewriting of the nation’s economic rules, from regulation to the tax code and labor rights. Both parties have gone along with the project, and the consequences are everywhere to see in the American economy: great wealth at the top (and especially at the very top), and everywhere else, increased insecurity, diminished opportunity, and stagnant or declining incomes. The situation is not hopeless, the authors argue, but change will come only when the middle class Americans organize as effectively as corporate America has.

  15. Damn. The blockquotes should be stepping up not down before the second italics.

  16. Q: What’s the difference between a Wisconsin public employee and a Somali pirate?

    A: Somali pirates pay for their own health insurance and retirement

  17. Q: What’s the difference between a wingnut and a Somali pirate?

    A: Somali pirates pay for their own health insurance and retirement

    (A bit of a pointless joke, but probably more based in reality than yours)

  18. Really Bad Reporting in Wisconsin: Who ‘Contributes’ to Public Workers’ Pensions?

    Oops:

    Unfortunately, his “smoking gun” is not true. Not even close.

    The Wisconsin Retirement System and deferred compensation are two completely separate things. Full-time state- and local-government employees are participants in the Wisconsin Retirement System, which uses taxpayer money to fund both the state (around 5 percent of salary) and employee (another 5 percent) contributions to their pensions.

    On top of that, if they choose, state employees can participate in the deferred-comp plan, where they decide how much of their money to set aside, pre-tax, and a portion is matched by the state. That is in addition to their traditional pension contribution.

    All this can be found in Chapter 40 of the Wisconsin State Statutes, which clearly demarcates each program in separate subchapters. Further, the Wisconsin Retirement System is explained in detail in this paper from the Wisconsin Legislative Fiscal Bureau.

  19. The Wisconsin Retirement System and deferred compensation are two completely separate things. Full-time state- and local-government employees are participants in the Wisconsin Retirement System, which uses taxpayer money to fund both the state (around 5 percent of salary) and employee (another 5 percent) contributions to their pensions.

    Uh-huh.

    Simple. The pension plan is the direct result of deferred compensation- money that employees would have been paid as cash salary but choose, instead, to have placed in the state operated pension fund where the money can be professionally invested (at a lower cost of management) for the future.

    Go read this, dumbass.

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