Black Woman Defends Dr Laura

Tara Wall wrote a rather good defense of Dr Laura Schlessinger.

She may not be the “right” messenger for some. But it’s about time someone other than self-righteous finger-pointing liberals brought this issue out into the open.

[...]

It’s ironic that the collective “we” spend so much time feigning outrage over a non-approved politically-incorrect person’s use of the n-word, without considering the context in which that person uttered it. Dr. Laura was bold enough to bring a very pertinent issue to the surface. Yet, as usual, all pundits (including some conservatives) and snake oil civil rights puppets can do is divert attention away from her point in order to make theirs. Even if you believe that Schlessinger is a racist, which no [one] really believes, isn’t the point she made — that no one should be able to say the word ni**a — a valid one?

It is particularly hard for me, as a black person, to hear other blacks refer to themselves this way. I’m quite certain President Obama doesn’t drop the n-bomb with his Chi-town homeboys. Why is it that the black community allows blacks to refer to one another by such a degrading term? We don’t hear Hispanics calling one another “wetbacks” or white people referring to one another as “honkeys?” It is truly sad that this is the best we have to say about one another — and that we accept its use. That it is often used to show affection is no excuse.

What’s more, blacks seem to be able to use derogatory terms to refer to people of other races without facing the repercussions that white people like Schlessinger face for using derogatory terms to refer to black people. That, too, I find intolerable.

Do read the rest of the article. Tara Wall says it like it is. The “n” word is highly offensive but, according to a certain group of people, only if non-blacks use it.

14 Comments

  1. Hitchcock looked far and wide and finally came up with one African-American person who supports Dr Laura.

    I support Dr Laura too, as I think she has given out lots of good advice over the years, in spite of her radical right political views. And, she did apologize for her thoughtless remarks. Finally, she herself chose to resign from broadcasting. Somehow I think she will be back.

    I think we should go a little easy on her, as she is a well-intentioned person who occasionally gets carried away. But don’t we all?

  2. in spite of her radical right political views.

    Interesting, yet again. Now, Dr. Laura is “radical right,” yet the GZ mosque imam is “moderate.”

  3. “The “n” word is highly offensive but, according to a certain group of people, only if non-blacks use it.”

    That’s just the way it is, blacks can call each other names and use words among themselves that are taboo for whites, any white, anytime. Face it. Whites shouldn’t get involved in arguing about it, it’s much too touchy, too emotional for public expression. Let blacks sort it out among themselves.

    This is one of those unique issues which fall outside considerations of fairness or equality, Yes, Dr Laura has freedom of speech, but America’s unfortunate history of racial discrimination makes some things so inappropriate as to render them unacceptable, not only in private conversation, but especially in broadcast or print media.

    Don’t fret about it, don’t argue about it, just don’t use it. Everyone will be better off.

  4. Let blacks sort it out among themselves.

    Excellent idea. Dr. Laura should have known the larger context here, that this is a “Black thing”, and like you said, it is their issue to resolve. Whites should stay out of it.

  5. No, whites should not have to just shut up and take it. Why should whites have to sit at the back of the bus on this? Dr Laura did know the larger context and that is precisely why she said it. That was her point, the inherent hypocritical double-standard involved.

    And, no Perry, I did not “search far and wide” to find a single black person to defend Dr Laura. There are plenty of others defending her as well. She should not have apologized and she should not have resigned. But like she said, she resigned so she could go on with her First Amendment rights.

    My neighbors are a mixed-race family. He uses the “n” word in a familial fashion, not a derogatory fashion. He sees no problem with it and sees no problem with any race using the word in a familial fashion. She, on the other hand, does see a problem with it. It is offensive to her, regardless of who uses the word or how it is used. He’s black and she’s white.

  6. Hitchcock looked far and wide and finally came up with one African-American person who supports Dr Laura.

    Oh dear, insulting blacks again, are we? Of course it would go against all that is acceptable by the thought police to understand and realize that blacks, just like whites, come in a variety of political persuasion and beliefs and views. Yet it appears easier for some to continue to paint with the broad brush and assume the worst about this race. *Of course all blacks were offended and indignant by Dr. Laura* Think for themselves? Heck no! We can’t have that! So clearly this black woman is an anomaly at best!

    Gimme a break.

    With that though, I tend to agree with ropelight. Let them sort it out. My black friend was distressed by it because yet again, it’s out there that this denigrating term is used by blacks toward other blacks. She feels it represents the uncouth.

    While Dr. Laura may have known the larger context, to use it was foolish. How could she not know the reaction would be just what it was? I don’t think she changed any minds, but perhaps reinforced those who believe the ridiculous ‘if you’re on the right, you’re a racist’ meme. For one as intelligent as she is, she used very little discernment or prudence.

  7. other Dana: “Oh dear, insulting blacks again, are we?”

    That is in your perception, other Dana, but not my intent. And then your later comments in your first paragraph, assuming them to be my attitude, couldn’t be farther from the truth. Please don’t do that, other Dana; it demeans you, in my view!

    Face it, one Aftican-American’s opinion is good to hear, but anecdotal, therefore not evidence for the feelings of any more than that one. I seriously doubt that there would be very many African-Americans who would agree with this lady. But mark my words, other Dana, I respect her opinion just like I respect yours, even when I cannot agree.

    Regarding your comment about Dr Laura, we agree, and she herself agrees too!

  8. Perry, I’ve always been curious: Just how many anecdotals equal a valid and viable position? Seriously. Because what I regularly see is if a point doesn’t agree with one’s own assumed agenda, it’s written off as anecdotal, wherein if it concurs up with one’s agenda or pov, it’s given a position of authoritativeness.

    One thing you neglect in your assumption is that the media is clearly reluctant to give blacks who may be supportive of Dr. Laura and/or her “radical right’ politics, a voice. What a shame such discriminations continue.

  9. other Dana:

    An anecdote is fine, but it is not proof of anything unless a study is done, or unless the person making the statement had established credibility in the subject. You probably already know this, but it is worth repeating: Inducing a conclusion from one observation (datum) or too a limited data base, is very risky. In order to make a credible conclusion, the deduction process is needed, using a statistically significant number of observations, which is critical part of the scientific method.

    Although John H.’s post was interesting, it was not definitive, which is the point I tried to make in a snarky sort of a way. That was not very effective, because it put you off, and onto some assumptions about me which are not at all true. This sort of thing happens frequently on here, because we appear on here in one dimension, hardly enough input to know a person as well as in person.

    If you have ever attended a get-together of blog commenters, you will know what I am saying.

    Regarding your comment about the reluctant media, you may be correct, I just don’t know. I will say that I myself have yet to see the African-American point of view of Dr Laura. If you heard the tape, her caller was African-American – her angry rant prevented the caller from getting a word in.

    I have listened to Dr Laura of[f] and on for years, though she has not been on our local radio station for several years. To me, her politics were radical right, based on her strong support for the Cheney/Bush wars. Instead we get a daily diet of Limbaugh, Savage, Ingraham, and a local Tea Partier who is to the right of all three, if you can imagine that. Fortunately we have an excellent NPR outlet here which helps me to maintain my sanity! :)

  10. She was right. Period. Libtards, nanny-staters and thought police have made this word sacred (for mind-control, and emotionalism amongst Blacks to cement their power base). To me, as a Black guy, the word nigger, nigga… is foolish and dumb. It’s retarded that Blacks use it period. But when these dummies/dhimmis get involved, they make race a sacred cow. White people shouldn’t have to put up with this… How many more people have to have their careers derailed b/c of simply speaking their minds.. I am so damn sick and tired of seeing this damn double-standard on race in this country. Race is being used to divide everyone. I hate the term African-American… I am an American. I wish Wjite people would start standing up for what they believe, quit bowing down before all the aforementioned libtards. And for BLACK FOLK TO STOP LIVING DOWN TO SOME QUASI-CULTURAL BELIEF SYSTEM that promotes a parasitic lifestyle, underachievement, and a sorry existence. I thought we were supposed to be a post-racist nation b/c Obama got elected?

  11. other Dana: “One thing you neglect in your assumption is that the media is clearly reluctant to give blacks who may be supportive of Dr. Laura and/or her “radical right’ politics, a voice. What a shame such discriminations continue.”

    What is your evidence for that statement, other Dana?

    As far as anecdotal information is concerned, I have no quarrel with that. What I do object to is when a commenter attempts to generalize from an anecdote. When I see that done on an important issue, I consider it my duty to call it out for what it is.

  12. What I do object to is when a commenter attempts to generalize from an anecdote. When I see that done on an important issue, I consider it my duty to call it out for what it is.

    Oh golly — “my duty.” Too bad you don’t enact “your duty” on yourself. If you did, you’d be self-policing yourself 24 hrs. a day.

    What a laugh.

  13. Burton C. Rogers said: “I thought we were supposed to be a post-racist nation b/c Obama got elected?”

    One would think so. I would hope so. I am afraid we still have a long way to go, don’t you think so Burton?

    On the use of the moniker ‘African-American’, I think it is a less racist term compared to the ‘N’ word and ‘black’. I’m interested in hearing your comment, that you would prefer to be called just ‘American’.

    How then does one deal with issues that are related to the racial divide which continues to thrive in our country, the main evidence for which is the continued neglect of the needs of our inner cities, especially in the education arena?

    It is also noteworthy that the unemployment rate of blacks is something like triple that of whites.

  14. “By the way, don’t call her “African American.” She hates that term. Why? If you must refer to her race, call her “black.” And La Shawn is not a Republican. She’s an independent conservative.

    “La Shawn Barber’s Corner” launched in November 2003.”

    From La Shawn Barber’s “Who Am I?” page.

Comments are closed.